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Read a real life story of how Carin underwear can empower you!

19.10.2016 | Posted in: Bladder Weakness, Incontinence Exercises, Pelvic Floor Exercises, Pelvic Floor Muscles, Wasahble Incontinence | Author: Colin

Allanda now supply Carin’s washable smart underwear and pelvic floor exercise programme, which help women regain bladder control and confidence in everyday life. We are proud to introduce Carin within our diverse portfolio of wearables promoting a ‘care to cure’ approach.

Click here to read Natasja story.

 

How to improve your bladder control

28.09.2016 | Posted in: Advice, Incontinence Exercises, Pelvic Floor Exercises, Pelvic Floor Muscles | Author: Colin

Around 11million men and women suffer from weakened pelvic floor muscles, but there are ways to get them back in shape.

A weak bladder might be more common than hay fever but it’s still a hugely taboo subject.

So women everywhere applauded Hollywood actress Kate Winslet when she talked openly about her post-children bladder problems.

In a TV interview last November the Oscar winner, 40, confessed: “I can’t jump on trampolines anymore – I wet myself. It’s bloody awful, especially if you’re wearing a skirt. When you’ve had a few children it’s just what happens.”

A third of British women admit they’ve suffered from stress incontinence after a fit of the giggles or an exercise session.

And although more commonly ­associated with women following ­childbirth, stress incontinence is a problem that can affect both sexes, with one in 10 men in the UK also affected, most often following prostate surgery.

Why it happens to women

Stress incontinence occurs when urine leaks out at times when the bladder is under pressure – this can be from laughing, coughing or from any exercise that involves jumping.

For women this usually happens because the pelvic floor muscles that support the urethra have been damaged by pregnancy or childbirth, or have lost tone following the drop in hormones after the menopause.

Alongside stress incontinence, there’s a related condition also caused by ­weakened pelvic floors known as ‘urge incontinence’ – which causes a sudden sense of urgency forcing sufferers to rush to the toilet with little warning, or risk wetting themselves.

How men can be affected

For men, bladder weakness most commonly occurs after prostate surgery and can be one of the biggest challenges to overcome during the recovery process.

Like women, men can also suffer from age-related loss of pelvic muscle tone. This is because the urethra, the tube that carries urine out of the body, is shaped like a U-bend. In younger men the surrounding muscles contract strongly, helping expel the last drop of urine stuck in the bottom of the U-bend. However, with age these muscles can weaken, meaning some urine gets left behind. As a man walks away from the toilet, the movement stimulates the urethra to push out and leak the last bit of urine.

What you can do

There’s good robust evidence that physiotherapy – exercises targeted to strengthen the pelvic floor muscles – will improve symptoms for 75% of people with bladder incontinence.

Yoga may help reduce side effects of prostate cancer treatment

02.12.2015 | Posted in: Bladder Incontinence, Incontinence Exercises, Pelvic Floor Exercises, Pelvic Floor Muscles, Prostrate, Uncategorized | Author: Colin

Male patients who undergo radiation therapy for their prostate cancer can turn to practicing yoga to help reduce the adverse effects typically associated with the treatment, according to a recent study conducted by the University of Pennsylvania.

Scientists from UPenn’s Perelman School of Medicine examined the impact of Eischens yoga on prostate cancer by having 68 individuals diagnosed with the condition to participate in 75-minute yoga classes twice a week.

The researchers monitored the impact of the exercise on the prostate cancer patients through a set of questions that determined their fatigue levels, urinary incontinence, erectile dysfunction and their overall quality of life.

The team chose to measure these factors as they are some of the side effects most often seen in men with prostate cancer.

They also made use of Eischens yoga because of its sustainability for people of different body types, fitness levels and experience.

By the end of the program, the researchers found that prostate cancer patients who were able to complete the Eischens yoga classes while receiving radiation therapy had better results in terms of their urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction.

The UPenn believe the positive findings could be a result of yoga’s focus on strengthening an individual’s pelvic floor muscles and improving the flow of blood. This is viewed as a way to help reduce the impact of erectile dysfunction and urinary incontinence.

Pelvic Floor exercises effective at treating incontinence

18.09.2012 | Posted in: Advice, Allanda, Bladder Training, Incontinence, Pelvic Floor Exercises, Pelvic Floor Muscles | Author: Colin

If you are suffering with urinary incontinence, you need to look at pelvic floor exercises and bladder training.  You may have read previous articles about these exercises but if you had not taken previous research findings seriously, a July 2012 review by the American based Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) should give you more reason to start pelvic floor (otherwise know kegel) exercises.

According to the review, about 25% of young women and 44% to 57% of middle-aged and postmenopausal women experience involuntary urine loss. Their findings show that age, pregnancy, childbirth, menopause, hysterectomy, and obesity put women at a higher risk of suffering from urinary incontinence.

Fortunately, there are several forms of treatment for women suffering from urinary incontinence.  An independent team of investigators analysed 889 studies and prepared a comparative effectiveness review. The AHRQ review compared different treatments for urinary incontinence that included doing pelvic floor muscle (Kegel) exercises, bladder training; using medical devices, weight loss, medications and electrical stimulation, among others.

They found that “pelvic floor muscle training, combined with bladder training is effective for treating women with urinary incontinence without the risk of side effects. The drugs for urgency incontinence showed similar effectiveness. However, with some drugs, more women discontinued treatment due to bothersome side effects.”

Two simple ways to tackle incontinence

17.08.2012 | Posted in: Advice, Bladder Training, Incontinence, Pelvic Floor Exercises, Pelvic Floor Muscles | Author: Colin

There is no reason why anyone should have to feel embarrassed about incontinence, but it continues to be a common chronic health condition that diminishes quality of life.

Many women experience urinary incontinence for the first time during or after pregnancy. The physical changes of pregnancy, along with the stresses put on the pelvic floor, can cause urine leakage with exertion, coughing or sneezing. For many women, this problem resolves within several months postpartum. However, without treatment, some women may continue to have a chronic incontinence issues for life.

There are two main types of urinary incontinence, listed below. Some women develop a mix of the two.

Stress Urinary Incontinence

Causes:
-A weak pelvic floor.
-Urethral sphincter dysfunction.

Women who have stress incontinence experience urine leakage when pressure is put on the bladder during laughing, coughing, sneezing, or with exercise.

Urge Urinary Incontinence

Causes:
-Pregnancy or pelvic surgery such as C-section.
-Injury to pelvic area.
-Diseases such as diabetes, stroke, MS or other neurological conditions.

This condition is more commonly called ”overactive bladder.” Urge incontinence occurs when there is nerve dysfunction that causes bladder contractions outside of normal urination. Women with urge incontinence find that they have episodes where they experience an extremely strong and immediate need to urinate. The bladder contractions can make it difficult to make it to a bathroom.

Treatment
The first line of treatment is to strengthen the pelvic floor to help provide greater support and control. The pelvic floor muscles play an important role throughout a woman’s life in maintaining proper alignment of the spine and support and function of the pelvic organs. The muscles of the pelvic floor span from the pubic bone to tailbone, forming a figure eight around the urethra, vagina and anus. Weak pelvic muscles result in sagging and loss of support of the pelvic organs, and can lead to incontinence problems if not corrected.

Pelvic floor exercises (sometimes called “Kegel” exercises) are a great way to strengthen these muscles and are simple to perform, but require that you first identify how to correctly contract the pelvic floor muscles. One method for locating the pelvic floor muscles is to note the area that contracts when you stop urinating. The muscles responsible for stopping urine flow are the pelvic floor muscles. You can use the urine stop-and-start test when initially learning how to locate and isolate the muscle group.

Pelvic Floor Exercises
Two or three times a day, do 5-10 repetitions of each exercise listed below. Build up to two times a day of 25-50 repetitions of each exercise. If your pelvic floor muscles fatigue quickly, do fewer repetitions each time, but increase the frequency throughout the day.

Quick Flicks:
Contract your pelvic floor muscles quickly and release.

Elevator:
Slowly contract your pelvic floor muscles (think of lifting up like an elevator moving up floors), progressively increasing your contraction, and then slowly releasing back down. You can increase the effectiveness of this exercise by holding for five seconds at the top of the contraction.

Your abdomen, buttocks, and thighs should not be tensed when doing these exercises.  Lie, sit, or stand with your legs slightly apart so you can isolate the correct area. No one will be able to tell that you are doing these exercises, so you can do them anywhere. It’s helpful to give yourself a ”cue” to do your exercises; for example, try to remind yourself to do them while brushing your teeth or driving to work. You should contract your pelvic floor muscles each time you lift something, laugh, sneeze, or cough to provide support and prevent further weakening.

Increasing pelvic floor strength is helpful for reducing stress incontinence, and the exercises can be part of the treatment for those with ”overactive bladder” or urge incontinence issues.

In addition, those with urge incontinence can improve the condition with the following bladder-retraining program:

1. When you feel a strong bladder urge, stop and stand (or preferably sit) very still.
2. Squeeze your pelvic floor muscles 5-6 times to prevent leaking.
3. Relax by taking a deep breath and exhaling several times until the urge reduces.
4. Slowly walk to the bathroom. If the urge suddenly becomes strong again, go back through the steps to regain control and retrain your bladder response.

Additional treatments can range from biofeedback and behavior interventions to medications and surgery. The key for effectively treating an incontinence problem is proper diagnosis and follow-up with a healthcare provider who is trained to treat this condition.

Remember, if you suffer from incontinence, you are not alone! It is an easily solvable and common problem that you don’t need to feel ashamed of.

 

Survey shows benefit of Pelvic Floor Exercises for Urinary Incontinence

15.08.2012 | Posted in: Advice, Allanda, Bladder Training, News, Pelvic Floor Exercises, Pelvic Floor Muscles, Urinary Incontinence | Author: Colin

A July 2012 review by the American based Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) should give you more reason to start pelvic floor (otherwise known as kegel) exercises.

According to the review, about 25% of young women and 44% to 57% of middle-aged and postmenopausal women experience involuntary urine loss. Their findings show that age, pregnancy, childbirth, menopause, hysterectomy, and obesity put women at a higher risk of suffering from urinary incontinence. Fortunately, there are several forms of treatment for women suffering from urinary incontinence.

An independent team of investigators analysed 889 studies and prepared a comparative effectiveness review. The AHRQ review compared different treatments for urinary incontinence that included doing pelvic floor muscle (Kegel) exercises, bladder training; using medical devices, weight loss, medications and electrical stimulation, among others.

They found that “pelvic floor muscle training, combined with bladder training is effective for treating women with urinary incontinence without the risk of side effects.  The drugs for urgency incontinence showed similar effectiveness. However, with some drugs, more women discontinued treatment due to bothersome side effects.”

Pelvic Floor Exercises Prevent Incontinence

02.08.2012 | Posted in: Female Incontinence, Pelvic Floor Exercises, Pelvic Floor Muscles, Pregnancy, Urinary Incontinence | Author: Colin

A 12-week exercise program, including pelvic floor muscle training  (other wise known as Pelvic Floor Exercises), during pregnancy can help prevent and treat urinary incontinence in late pregnancy, according to research published online July 17 in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

Signe N. Stafne, P.T., of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim, and colleagues conducted a randomized controlled trial involving 855 pregnant women who were randomly allocated to either an intervention comprising a 12-week once-weekly physical therapist-led group exercise session, including PFMT, conducted between weeks 20 and 36 of gestation, or regular antenatal care.

The researchers found that 11 percent of women in the intervention group reported any weekly urinary incontinence, compared to 19 percent of controls (P = 0.004). Three percent of women in the intervention group reported fecal incontinence compared with 5 percent of controls, but the difference did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.18).

“The results from the present trial indicate that pregnant women should do pelvic floor muscle training to prevent and treat urinary incontinence in late pregnancy. Thorough instruction in correct pelvic floor muscle contraction and pelvic floor muscle training is important, and specific pelvic floor muscle exercises should be included in exercise classes for pregnant women,” the authors write. “Any possible long-term effects on urinary incontinence and the preventive effect of pelvic floor muscle training on anal incontinence should be explored further.”

Pelvic Floor Exercises App

15.05.2012 | Posted in: Advice, Allanda, Pelvic Floor Exercises, Pelvic Floor Muscles, Tena, TENA Lady | Author: Colin

We’re always talking about the benefits of Pelvic Floor Exercises for managing Incontinence and Bladder problems. Well it seems that the folks at Tena are just as strong believers as Allanda. They’ve just launched their new Pelvic Floor Exercises “App” which reminds you when and how to do Pelvic Floor Exercises, you can download it at www.lightsbytena.co.uk/mypffapp.

Those who want a refresher on Pelvic Floor Exercises can watch our video.

Pelvic floor exercises are safer and significantly more effective than medication for managing urinary incontinence

27.04.2012 | Posted in: Allanda, Incontinence, Pelvic Floor Exercises, Pelvic Floor Muscles, Stress Incontinence, Urge Incontinence, Urinary Incontinence | Author: Colin

A recent study published in Modern Medicine Magazine says that Pelvic floor exercises are safer and significantly more effective than medication for managing both stress and urgency urinary incontinence. It also said that regardless of the therapeutic approach, patient compliance is critical to long-term success.

Overall, drugs for urinary incontinence (UI) were said to have relatively little benefit, as side effects kept compliance low, and long-term safety was still questionable. Contrastingly pelvic floor exercises could make a significant difference if women stuck with it, according to a Comparative Effectiveness Review conducted by the Effective Health Care Program arm of the American Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

The analysis of 905 studies found that nonpharmacologic treatment—Pelvic Floor Exercises —can result in significant benefit, making up to 100% difference in incontinence rates, with no adverse effects. Similar rates of success were reported, regardless of whether patients used biofeedback with the exercises.

By comparison, the report noted that drug treatments are more effective than placebo, but the degree of benefit was low for all drugs, with fewer than 200 cases of continence attributable to treatment per 1,000 women. Dry mouth, constipation, and blurred vision were cited as the side effects chiefly responsible for low compliance with the prescription drugs.

Women with daily stress urinary incontinence perceive clinical benefit from a treatment when frequency is reduced approximately 50%, but they typically only report improved quality of life and clinical success when they experience at least a 70% reduction in frequency. Similarly, more than 60% of women with persistent urgency, stress, or mixed urinary incontinence report complete treatment satisfaction when they experience more than 70% reduction of incontinence episodes.

The review reports that available diagnostic tests are of minimal value in distinguishing women with stress or urgency urinary  inconitinence. Although nonsurgical treatment decisions are driven by clinical evaluation with validated tools for diagnosis of urinary incontinence, multichannel urodynamics was no more accurate than patients’ self-reports of symptoms at predicting who would benefit from nonsurgical options.

Harry Potter star talks about using incontinence products on set

23.04.2012 | Posted in: Advice, Incontinence Pads, Incontinence Products, News, Pelvic Floor Exercises, Pelvic Floor Muscles | Author: Colin

Helena Bonham Carter

Harry Potter star, Helena Bonham Carter, has suprisingly revealed that she wore incontinence pads on set because her pelvic floor was too weak to control her leaky bladder following recent child birth in an interview with the Sunday Times “Style” Magazine. (Sunday Times 22 April 2012).

This highlights the importance of pelvic floor exercises throughout pregnancy, and even before for the 15,000 new mothers who give birth every week.

Details about how to do Pelvic Floor Exercises can be found in a recent video produced by Allanda featuring Ann Winder, Incontinence Expert. The video is featured on our website at www.allaboutincontinence.co.uk or at our YouTube channel.